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The Doppelganger - click for larger image (opens new window in browser)
An image, called "The Doppelganger" is from a drawing that Steiner did for the stained glass in his building.

Steiner's representation of the Doppleganger.

The snake with the horned human head. This is certainly an odd statement.

There is a paradox with Steiner's material. Steiner is brilliant at times - and these are perhaps the very times he was least understood.

In this group of readings is a piece from Ravencroft's book 'The Spear of Destiny'. In his book Ravencroft tells us that a copy of the attached sketch was found in Heinrick Himmler's personal papers. Ravencroft gives us to understand that Himmler certainly knew that the rising snake represented the human Doppleganger. The Nazis hated and feared Steiner simply because he was so capable a clairvoyant.

As an aside, its interesting that in many modern art histories Leadbeater and other clairvoyants from the late 1800's and early 1900's are seen as the originators of the modern abstract form.

So let's look more closely at the sketch.

The human headed snake rises from a cleft in the rocks, reminiscent of aboriginal serpent stories. Also of the Kundalini representations that one finds among esoteric yoga teachers who talk of Chakras.

The raising serpent has seven mode points, little brains along the way, each has a little wing like appendixes associated with it. The head on the top has an amazing focused, blank, staring expression. It could be a human head looking into a TV screen!

The figure on the left, the human giving blessing and radiating energy may well represent the human aspect trying to heal our Double, our Serpent into submission.

Or it all may mean something else! And perhaps your guess is as good or better than mine. So please do speak up and let us hear what you think!





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original content by Steven Guth,
page uploaded 14 September 2003