William Gibson


photo from external linkWilliam Gibson information page


William Gibson was born in the United States in 1948, but moved to Canada at age nineteen.  His first novel, Neuromancer, won the Hugo Award, the Philip K. Dick Memorial Award, and the Nebula Award in 1984. Gibson is credited with having coined the term "Cyberspace," and with having envisioned both The Internet and Virtual Reality before either existed.  At the same time he eschewed advanced technology, writing Neuromancer on an old typewriter (indeed, "Gibson's Typewriter" has become part of the folklore of the modern world)

The modest and unassuming Gibson single-handedly founded, and remains a leading writer in, the genre of Cyberpunk, extrapolating contemporary technology and socio-economic trends into a future of urban decay and the social mores of a post-punk generation.  He has been hailed as 'the new George Orwell' (The Sunday Times) and 'the Raymond Chandler of SF' (Observer), and there is no denying the influence of Raymond Chandler in his gritty noir style and hard-bitten (anti-)heros.

William Gibson now lives in Vancouver, British Columbia with his wife and their two children.

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Bibliography


The Neuromancer Trilogy:
    Neuromancer
    Mona Lisa Overdrive
     Count Zero

The Idoru Trilogy:
     Virtual Light
    Idoru
    All Tomorrow's Parties

short stories:
    Burning Chrome (a collection of short stories)

other novels:
    The Difference Engine (With Bruce Sterling)
     Virtual Light
    Idoru

The Difference Engine is a sort of alternative history set in a 19th century world of steam-driven mechanical computers.  This book initiated the short-lived genre of  Steampunk. (gotta love that name!  ;-)  - there is even a charcter in the "Sinister & Dexter" series of Judge Dredd 2000 AD comic book called "Steampunk Willy")

Gibson also wrote the screenplay for Johnny Mnemonic, based on one of his short stories of the same name.  Unfortunately it was a big flop at the Box Office, and the quality of the script was (apart from a few good lines) greatly inferior to his prose.   More recently he has worked with Chris Carter on episodes of The X-Files (the episode external linkKill Switch, co-scripted with Tom Maddox, being one of the rare examples of successful adaptation of cyberpunk to TV) and Harsh Realm, and is tentatively looking (with Chris Cunningham) at adapting Neuromancer to video.



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links - William Gibson - Links - links

William Gibson and bridge Bridge To Tomorrow - Cyber-fiction dean William Gibson looks at San Francisco in the near future in his latest book


web page An Interview with William Gibson

Neuromancer's Matrix - a cool new site - home to the William Gibson Ring

Resources on William Gibson - comprehensive

web page William Gibson Information

WILLIAM GIBSON TOOLKIT - bibliography, reviews, and an Encyclopedia. The Encyclopedia presently contains only Neuromancer.

web page an interview with William Gibson by Dan Josefsson - Gibson's thoughts on the Internet, social problems in America, and why he does not even have an email addy, let alone a web page!  Good stuff!

web page NO SLACK IN TOKYO - A review of William Gibson's novel Virtual Light

book on line Burning Chrome (entire collection online)

The Cyberpunk Project William Gibson


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text by M.Alan Kazlev
page uploaded 4 January 1999, last modified 22 April 2005

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