Consciousness and the Universe

Ultimately, everything in the Universe is Conscious at some level, only we are not aware of it (the consciousness of a stone for example is so far beneath our consciousness that we tend to think that a stone lacks consciousness.  Sri Aurobindo coined the term 'inconscient" to refer to this constricted consciousness.

On the physical level, consciousness ranges from the utter self-involution of matter (inconscience or inconscious) to the consciousness of the intelligent lifeforms whether natural or artificial, and beyond to enlightened beings, bodhisattvas and avatars.  On the subtle (supra-physical) level consciousness includes many hierarchies of existence.  In all these diverse modes, consciousness represents the inward or "within" faculty of the cosmos, as opposed to the outward or physical aspect.  The outward aspect of the universe is a part of the mundane physical plane and hence amenable to rationalistic scientific study.  The inward aspect is at best the province of ethnology and psychology, and at worst (from the reductionist's point of view) something that can only be deduced through esotericism and occult enquiry.

When you consider the varius grades that make up the evolving universe than, you get the following:
 

Cosmic Consciousness
(Noetic)
Consciousness
(inward)
Ideational/Noeric
(pure mind-stuff)
Noospheres & 
Technospheres
(innermost outward)
Emotional/Orectic
(pure feeling-stuff)
biosphere
Biospheres___
(panetary ecosystems)
Formative/Etheric
(pure life-stuff/ higher
morphogenetic fields)
Formative/Etheric
(lower morphogenetic fields)
geosphere_____
Geospheres
planetary bodies 
astrosphere
Astrosphere 
steller bodies 
Quantum fields
Hylospheres
(outermost)_

The stages from geosphere to theosphere represent the ideal course of planetary evolution (of course not all large masses pass through these stages, most get no further than hylosphere or astrosphere).  These are described in more detail in the Ages of Gaia section
 
 
 
 
 
Cosmos page
Cosmos

 
 
 
 
 

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page uploaded 30 November 1998